Google's Project Ara will come to consumers in 2017

May 24 2016 1:26PM


MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF. — If you've been wondering what's going on with Google's effort to create modular smartphones, also known as Project Ara, wonder no more.At the company's I/O developer conference, Google showed the progress it's made in building phones that let users swap individual components (like the camera) in and out like they're AA batteries. It also revealed its timetable for Ara's release, with the official developer version coming in the fall and a consumer model arriving sometime in 2017.During a jam-packed event from Google's Advanced Technology And Projects (ATAP) division, Google's Rafa Camargo, ATAP's technical and engineering lead, gave more details on the technology. The frame of an Ara phone will have slots for up to six modules, and each slot can support any module. Each slot is capable of transferring data at 11.6GB per second, can draw one-third of the power spec of USB 3.0, and is capable of interconnecting with all other slots in the frame, regardless of position.
[embedded content]

Popping modules in and out is a simple affair, and Camargo showed how a user can snap in a camera module and begin taking photos within seconds. Even better, a user can use voice to remove a module — simply say "Okay, Google, eject my..." and the module will pop out.Importantly, many of the core smartphone functions are now built into the frame, as opposed to modules. The phone's processor, main sensors, antenna and display won't be modular, which the Project Ara website says is to free up "more room for hardware in each module."Camargo also addressed the concern that the design of Ara phones might be bulky or unwieldy, saying they can be smaller, larger or the same as current smartphones — it's up to the user. It also said at device categories completely different from phones, and that car-specific modules are in the works.For the consumer version, Camargo said it would be "light" and "beautiful."As for why consumers would want a modular phone in the first place, Google presented a compelling example of a use case: If you're a diabetic, you likely carry a glucometer that interacts with an app on your phone. With an Ara phone, you could simply swap in a glucometer module and not worry about compromising performance of your device.Google makes a solid case for modular phones, and other players, most notably LG, are already following suit with some limited modularity. We could be approaching an era where your smartphone hardware is as customizable as the home screen.BONUS: Hands on with Android Wear 2.0
Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Source:-Techgig.Com

Write Your Valuable Opinion

Goverment Updates

Corporate Updates

IT Updates